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Biology of Bladder Cancer (R21 Clinical Trial Optional)

HHS-NIH11

Status:

Active

July 26, 2022

Posted:

Deadline: 

September 7, 2025

Funding

Program:

Award Floor:

Ceiling:

275000

Match Required?

No

Eligibility

All

States:

Entity Types:

State governments, County governments, City or township governments, Special district governments, Independent school districts, Public & State controlled institutions of higher education, Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized), Public housing authorities, Native American tribal organizations, Nonprofits (with 501(c)(3) status), Nonprofits (without 501(c)(3) status)

Other Eligible Applicants include the following: Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions; Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institutions (AANAPISISs); Eligible Agencies of the Federal Government; Faith-based or Community-based Organizations; Hispanic-serving Institutions; Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs); Indian/Native American Tribal Governments (Other than Federally Recognized); Non-domestic (non-U.S.) Entities (Foreign Organizations); Regional Organizations; Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs) ; U.S. Territory or Possession.

Contact

Email:

Phone:

Source Type:

Federal

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) solicits applications investigating the biology and underlying mechanisms of bladder cancer. Bladder cancer is a significant health problem both in the United States and globally. Because of the high incidence and frequent tumor recurrence, bladder cancer exacts an outsized medical burden. While recent progress has been made in the molecular profiling of bladder cancers and identification of mutated genes, relatively little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms driving initiation, progression, and malignancy of bladder cancer. Furthermore, our understanding of biological processes of the normal bladder at the molecular, cell and organ levels is limited. Fundamental knowledge of how molecular and cellular functions of the bladder are altered in cancer will aid our understanding of bladder cancer biology and interventions. Applications that involve multidisciplinary teams and use clinical specimens or investigate both normal and cancer processes are encouraged.

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