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Social, Cultural and Economic Assessment of Harmful Algal Blooms

DOC

Status:

Active

August 22, 2023

Posted:

Deadline: 

January 17, 2024

Funding

1500000

Program:

300000

Award Floor:

Ceiling:

400000

Match Required?

No

Eligibility

All

States:

Entity Types:

Unrestricted

Eligible applicants for Federal financial assistance in this competition are U.S institutions of higher education, other non-profits, state, local, tribal government entities, U.S. Territories, and for-profit organizations. Federal agencies that possess the statutory authority to receive transfers of funds are eligible to submit applications for intra- or inter-agency funds transfers through this competition. Department of Commerce (DOC)/NOAA supports cultural and gender diversity and encourages women and minority individuals and groups to submit applications to its programs. In addition, DOC/NOAA is strongly committed to broadening the participation of historically black colleges and universities, Hispanic serving institutions, tribal colleges and universities, Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander-Serving Institutions, and institutions that work in underserved areas. DOC/NOAA encourages encourages applications involving any of the above institutions to apply.Please note that: (1) PIs must be employees of an eligible entity listed above; and applications must be submitted through that entity. Non-Federal researchers should comply withtheir institutional requirements for application submission.(2) Non-Federal researchers affiliated with NOAA-University Cooperative/Joint Institutes will be funded through cooperative agreements.(3) Foreign researchers must apply as subawards or contracts through an eligible U.S. entity. (4) Federal applicants are eligible to submit applications for intra- or inter-agency funds transfers through this competition. Non-NOAA Federal applicants will be required to submit certifications or documentation showing that they have specific legal authority to accept funds for this type of research.(5) An eligible U.S. entity may propose Federal agency researchers as funded or unfunded collaborators. If Federal agency researchers are proposed as fundedcollaborators, the applicant should present the collaborator's funding request in the application in the same way documentation is provided for a subrecipient for purposes of project evaluation, even though intra- or inter-agency funding transfers will generally be used if the project is selected.(6) NCCOS researchers may apply through an eligible U.S. entity as funded or unfunded collaborators but cannot be the lead PI on the application. NOAA Federal salaries will not be paid.

Contact

Email:

Phone:

(301) 941-7968

Source Type:

Federal

1. Social, Cultural, and Economic Assessment of HABs Priorities NCCOS/CRP is soliciting proposals that assess the social, cultural and economic impacts of HAB events. Research funded through this opportunity may guide future research on the social, cultural and economic impacts of HAB events at a local, state, and regional, and national level, and inform the selection of management strategies and methods most appropriate to a specific HAB event and ongoing issues. Resulting research will also provide the necessary building blocks that can lead to a better national assessment of the social, cultural and economic impacts from HAB events. Proposals must address at least one of the following priorities: - Social and/or cultural impacts of HAB events response at local, state and/or regional scales. - Economic impacts of HAB events at local, state and/or regional scales. - Impacts of HAB events on subsistence at local, state and/or regional scales. Within one of these priorities, ideal proposals will address at least one of the following objectives: - Assess the impacts of HAB events on different human uses ( e.g., commercial, recreational, and subsistence), human communities, social networks, and/or individuals; - Identify and/or quantify actual and potential vulnerability and resilience of industries (e.g, shellfish, seafood and tourism), communities, and/or individuals to HAB events; - Evaluate behavioral response to HAB events and/or HAB prevention, control and mitigation strategies; - Measure the cost and benefits of HAB prevention, control, and mitigation strategies. Examples include research that helps: - Assess the social and/or cultural impacts of HAB events (e.g., changes in recreation and tourism, community conflict, changes in social, cultural, and/or psychological well-being, etc.); - Assess subsistence impacts of HAB events (e.g., lost fishing and seafood access, changes in subsistence, changes in social, cultural, and/or psychological well-being, etc.); - Assess the social and or cultural impacts of HAB events on vulnerable social groups or communities (e.g., are some groups disproportionately affected or less able to avert harm?); - Evaluate behavioral changes that may occur during and after HAB events in different sectors and communities (e.g., temporal and spatial shifts in activities, changes commercial, recreational and subsistence use, community conflict, etc.); - Evaluate perceptions, value, and use of information (e.g., how people perceive, understand, and act on advisories, trust or distrust management decisions, etc.); - Determine the economic impacts of HAB events across communities, demographic groups, regions, and policy interventions (e.g., loss of access, loss in revenue, cost of avoidance, etc.) - Estimate loss and cost by HAB events and sector (e.g., aquaculture industry, recreational activities, coastal tourism, etc.); - Measure economic impacts of HAB events on individuals, households and communities associated with commercial, recreational, and subsistence fisheries (e.g., economic impact analysis, cost-benefit analysis, etc.) Possible research products and outputs may include: 1) Research and strategies that lead to more accurate assessments of the direct social, cultural and or economic impacts of HAB events at the local, state, and regional scales 2) Development and/or use of transferable research approaches that can be applied to different HAB events and at different scales (e.g., local, state, regional). While 3 to 5 projects are expected to be funded, NCCOS/CRP envisions funding at least one project focused on social, cultural and/or subsistence impacts of HAB events and at least one project focused on economic impacts of HAB events. 2. Examples of Non-Applicable Research Topics NCCOS CRP coordinates with other NOAA, federal, and state research programs to leverage their research investments and avoid duplication of effort. The scope of these programs has been described in several reports (6,10,11,12,13). NCCOS Competitive HAB Programs will not fund research in the following areas: a) Research on inland or freshwater HABs except in the Great Lakes and coastal waters, which, as defined in the Coastal Zone Management Act (16 U.S.C. 1453 (3)), contain a measurable quantity or percentage of seawater. Research on freshwater toxins that are transported into the coastal zone is, however, permitted. b) Disease surveillance, clinical characterization, and therapeutic guidance in humans are the purview of other agencies, such as NSF/NIEHS COHH, CDC and FDA. c) Routine monitoring for HAB cells and toxins and water quality. d) Operational HAB forecasting and observation systems. 3. Management Technical Advisory Group Application of research results for use by managers, policy-makers, and other end users through a highly integrated and collaborative approach is a central objective of NCCOS/CRP. Proposals should clearly articulate outcome-based management goals of the project (more information can be found in Section IV.B. and at https://coastalscience.noaa.gov/about/fundingopportunities/outputs-and- outcomes/) and a continuous engagement process with relevant end users. Engagement activities with end users may include, but are not limited to, annual meetings, workshops, training sessions on how to apply information or tools, and inclusion on coordination calls. The Lead Principal Investigator (PI) is strongly encouraged to establish a Management Transition Advisory Group (MTAG) to ensure effective collaboration between the project PI(s) and end users, and successful transfer of research results to the intended end user(s). 4. References (1) NOAA FY2020-2024 Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan, December 2020. https://www.noaa.gov/sites/default/files/legacy/document/2020/Dec/NOAA% 202020-2024%20Diversity%20and%20Inclusion%20Strategic%20Plan.pdf. (2) Government-Wide Strategic Plan To Advance Diversity, Equity, Inclusion. Accessibility In The Federal Workforce, November 2021. The White House. https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Strategic-Plan-to- Advance-Diversity-Equity-Inclusion-and-Accessibility-in-the-Federal-Workforce- 11.23.21.pdf. (3) Executive Order On Advancing Racial Equity and Support for Underserved Communities Through the Federal Government (EO 13985), January 20, 2021. https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/presidential-actions/2021/01/20 /executive-order-advancing-racial-equity-and-support-for-underserved- communities-through-the-federal-government/ (4) NOAA Blue Economy Strategic Plan 2021-2025, January 2021. https://oceanservice.noaa.gov/economy/blue-economy-strategy/. (5) Proceedings of the Workshop on the Socio-economic Effects of Harmful Algal Blooms in the United States, U.S. National Office for Harmful Algal Blooms, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, March 2021. https://repository.library.noaa.gov/view/noaa/33455. (6) National Science and Technology Council, Subcommittee on Ocean Sciences and Technology, 2016. Harmful Algal Blooms and Hypoxia Comprehensive Research Plan and Action Strategy: An Interagency Report. Washington, DC. 94 pp. http://www.whoi.edu/fileserver.do?id=230904=10=19132. (7) HARRNESS, 2005. Harmful Algal Research and Response: A National Environmental Science Strategy 2005-2015. Ramsdell, J.S., D.M. Anderson and P.M. Glibert (Eds.), Ecological Society of America, Washington DC, 96 pp. http://www.esa.org/HARRNESS/harrnessReport10032005.pdf. (8) HARR-HD, Bauer, M., ed. 2006. Harmful Algal Research and Response: A Human Dimensions Strategy. National Office for Marine Biotoxins and Harmful Algal Blooms, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, 58 pp (9) HAB RDDTT. 2008. Harmful Algal Bloom Research, Development, Demonstration, and Technology Transfer National Workshop Report. Dortch, Q., Anderson, D.M., Ayres, D.L., Glibert, P.M. (Eds). Woods Hole, MA. hab.whoi.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/RDDTT_National_Workshop_Report_ Final_43464.pdf. (10) Jewett, E.B., Lopez, C.B., Dortch, Q., Etheridge, S.M., Backer, L.C., 2008. Harmful Algal Bloom Management and Response: Assessment and Plan. Interagency Working Group on Harmful Algal Blooms, Hypoxia and Human Health of the Joint Subcommittee on Ocean Science and Technology. Washington, DC, 76 pp. https://obamawhitehouse.archives.gov/sites/default/ files/microsites/ostp/jsost_hab0908.pdf. (11) Lopez, C.B., Jewett, E.B., Dortch, Q., Walton, B.T., Hudnell, H.K. 2008. Scientific Assessment of Freshwater Harmful Algal Blooms. Interagency Working Group on Harmful Algal Blooms, Hypoxia, and Human Health of the Joint Subcommittee on Ocean Science and Technology, Washington, D.C., 65 pp. http://www.whoi.edu/fileserver.do?id=41023=10=19132. (12) National Assessment of Harmful Algal Blooms in U.S. Waters. 2000. National Science and Technology Council Committee on Environmental and Natural Resources, 47pp. https://docslib.org/doc/2056206/national-assessment-of- harmful-algal-blooms-in-us-waters. (13) NOAA National Sea Grant College Program. 2001. Prevention, Control, and Mitigation of Harmful Algal Blooms: A Research Plan. 28pp. http://www.whoi.edu/fileserver.do?id=24160=10=19132.

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